Old Page Ranch House

WASHINGTON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY     (Washington County, Utah)

LITTLE PINTO   (aka PAGE RANCH)

Iron County, Utah

Little Pinto or Page Ranch was an offshoot of Iron Town in Iron County. It was a very small settlement with only about a dozen or so
people. It was an important stopping point along what was once a major freighting and travel route through Southern Utah.


LOCATION

Roads and creek around the ranch       37° 34' 3.1" North Latitude,   113° 25' 23.3" West Longitude
      37.5674° North Latitude,   113.4232° West Longitude
      Elevation:   6,117 feet   (1,864 meters)

      Pinto Road = Forest Service Road NF-009
          going notheast to State Route 56
          and west to Pinto, Hamblin, and State Route 18
      The road heading south is NF-029 or Old State Highway 144
          and goes to New Harmony
      A road a little to the west goes north up to Iron Town

      For travel instructions to Page Ranch, click here.

      For an aerial view of the ranch in recent times, click here.

      Ranch boundaries


DESCRIPTION

1357 acres

The main house is still standing.

There is a spring-fed pond.

There is a tree house not far from the Page Home. The tree is currently in a pond and has grown into and around the tree house.


HISTORY

Page Ranch was originally settled in 1858 by Robert Richey, an Indian missionary in the Jacob Hamblin group sent to Southern
Utah by Brigham Young in 1854. The ranch was owned by the Richey and then Page families from 1858 to 1934.

Daniel Richey Page and Robert Richey Page, grandsons of the Indian missionary, lived at the ranch with their grandparents after
their mother's death on March 16, 1868. In 1890 Dan and Robert received the ranch from their grandparents, and one year later
Robert sold out his share to Dan.

The Page Ranch House was designed by its original occupants, Daniel Richey Page and Sophia Ann Geary Page. Construction
began in 1898 and was completed in 1900. The builders were Jack & Harvey Fabian of St. George, who made and fired the brick
on the site using clay found immediately west of the building location. Architecturally, this house is a good example of the Double
Cross-Wing, a relatively uncommon house type in Utah. Dan and his wife Sophia operated the ranch until their divorce around 1905.

This location was a historical stopping point along what was once a major freighting and travel route in the Iron County region of
southwestern Utah. The house served for 34 years as the home of the Page family who owned and operated the ranch. It also
served regularly as an informal hotel for travelers and as a boarding house for men working in the nearby iron ore mines. A notice
said, "We Keep Travelers".

The house was placed on the National Register of Historic Places (#85000961) on May 9, 1985.

The house is unoccupied, but still standing.

As of June 26, 2016, the property was for sale. See
Fidelity Real Estate, St. George
Peter Durkson at (435)703-5754 or Cindy Roy at (435) 703-5755
http://www.thepageranch.com

Owners:
Robert Richey
Daniel Richey Page and Robert Richey Page
Daniel Richey & Sophia Geary Page
Ambrose J. & Dorothy S. Sherratt
William E. & LaRue S. Keller


PHOTOS

Aerial view of the Page Ranch
WCHS-03126   Aerial photo of the Page Ranch

Ranch house and pond at the Page Ranch
WCHS-03127   The ranch house and pond at Page Ranch

Daniel R. & Sophia G. Page House on Page Ranch
Southwest corner of the Page House in October 1984
        Daniel R. & Sophia G. Page House on Page Ranch
        Northeast corner of the Page House in October 1984

WCHS photos:
WCHS-02624     Photo of the house and some people at the Page Ranch
WCHS-02625     Photo of the old clapboard house and some people at the Page Ranch
WCHS-03128     Photo of signs showing distaces from Page Ranch and the ranch house in the background

Photos on the web:
Photos on flickr taken by Mathew Montgomery 10/16/2008
Three photos by Bob Bezzant in Ghosttowns.com


REFERENCES

National Register of Historic Places completed Nomination Form
"   October 1984 photos by Roger Roper

Little Pinto Ghost Town, UT
in Southwest Backcountry: Exploring The West, Discovering the Past